Cheap Mexico Car Rental and Templo Mayor


Far beneath the modern buildings of Mexico City there lay a world carved from stone and the sweat of millions of men. This ancient city was revered both far and wide for its religious sanctity and violent army. Today, this ancient ruin refuses to remain lost, pushing its way past the modern architecture of Mexico's main plaza, Zocalo. Cheap Mexico car rental travelers are invited to explore this relic of days gone by inside the Templo Mayor of Tenochtitlan.

A temple of epic proportions
The Great Temple, or Templo Mayor as it is referred to in Spanish, was only part of a much larger sacred area located at the center of the great Aztec city of Tenochtitlan. The religious plaza, which may have contained some 78 buildings, was dedicated to the rain god Tlaloc, as well as the god of war, Huitzilopochtli. The Templo Mayor, which was built in 1390, enjoyed great prosperity throughout history, including six separate construction additions and redesigns. Unfortunately, the temple and the temple precinct were almost entirely destroyed in 1521 when Hernan Cortes and the Spaniards arrived in Mexico.

Uncovering the past
Lucky for cheap Mexico car rental travelers, excavators have been able to uncover a number of palatial rooms in the Templo Mayor, as well as conjoining structures. One of the best preserved finds is the Palace of the Eagle Warriors. This area, which dates back to the fourth stage of the temples construction, was likely built in 1469. It features an L-shaped room with staircases and eagle head sculptures. The room was built for a privileged class of warriors, the Eagle Warriors, who were dedicated to the war god Huitzilopochtli and dressed to look like Eagles. Other important finds in this room include paintings with clear Teotihuacan influences, and two almost identical ceramic sculptures of Mictlantecuhtl, the god of death.

A modern understanding of the past
Cheap Mexico car rental travelers can uncover the secrets behind the Templo Mayor inside the modern Museum of the Templo Mayor in Mexico City. Built in 1987, the Museum houses the Templo Mayor Project and its finds. Designed to blend in with its colonial surroundings, the Museum of the Templo Major features discrete architectural detailing. Cheap Mexico car rental travelers are invited to explore three of the four floors within the museum, including eight main exhibition halls. The halls are arranged as follows:

• Sala (Gallery) 1: Here, cheap Mexico car rental travelers will discover the first finds associated with the temple. The Sala is dedicated almost entirely to the goddesses Coatlicue and Coyalxauhqui, mother and sister to Huitzilopochtli, respectively.
• Sala 2: This gallery is dedicated to the concepts of ritual sacrifice. Cheap Mexico car rental travelers will discover funerary offerings in this exhibit, includes objects like musical instruments and knives associated with self and human sacrifice.
• Sala 3: This gallery provides visitors with a better understanding of the Aztec empire's economics.
• Sala 4: This area is dedicated entirely to the god Huitzilopochtli. AGA Cheap Mexico Car Rental customers will find various images of the god, as well as the famed statues of the god Mictlantecuhtli.
• Sala 5: This sala is dedicated to Tlaloc, the other principle deity of the Aztecs and one of the oldest deities in Mesoamerican history. The most prized piece in the museum is exhibited here: A large pot with the god's face in high relief that still preserves much of the original blue paint.
• Sala 6 and Sala 7: These two galleries are related in that they are dedicated to the flora and fauna of Mesoamerica during the Aztec empire. Cheap Mexico car rental travelers will find examples of agricultural technology of the time, as well as examples of plant and animal offerings found at the temple.
• Sala 8: The final gallery is dedicated to the archaeology and the history of the site.

For more information on the Templo Mayor and its many treasures, please visit the Museum of the Templo Mayor website at www.templomayor.inah.gob.mx. (Please note this website is in Spanish only).

Tourist Guide